Economic Benefit to Coastal Communities

Read the facts on these 3 common Myths about Farmed Salmon and the Economic Benefit to Coastal Communities.

MYTH #1 - Salmon farms are a threat to employment in coastal communities because farmed salmon competes for market share with wild salmon. The Facts 

MYTH #2 - First Nations in British Columbia are negatively impacted by fish farms and do not want them in their territories. The Facts 

MYTH #3 - The BC salmon farming industry is a huge multinational industry run by Norwegians. Norwegians came to Canada because there are no regulations and they have complete disregard for what happens in Canada. The Facts
 

MYTH #1

Salmon farms are a threat to employment in coastal communities because farmed salmon competes for market share with wild salmon.

The Facts:

It’s generally accepted that the loss of jobs in the commercial salmon fishing sector has nothing to do with competition from farmed salmon. The job loss is a result of two factors. First, there have been severe declines in many wild salmon stocks due to over-fishing, ocean conditions, and habitat loss. Canada, Norway, and other countries have adopted sweeping changes to harvest levels and gear types in the wild salmon fishery, driving many fishers out of the industry.

The salmon farming industry has been responsible for creating new jobs in hatcheries, on farms, and in fish processing plants. Salmon farming is the single largest employer in the northern Vancouver Island community of Port Hardy and in the Central Coast First Nations community of Klemtu. The industry currently employs approximately 5,000 people. Additional jobs could be created if the industry were permitted to grow to meet demand.

MYTH #2

First Nations in British Columbia are negatively impacted by fish farms and do not want them in their territories.

The Facts:

While some First Nations may be opposed to salmon farms, many others support them in their territory. For some First Nations communities, salmon farming provides a primary source of income and long-term employment.

Collectively, salmon farming companies in B.C. currently have 19 economic and social partnerships with First Nations, and are working towards many more, ensuring these communities share and have access to the long-term benefits of this sustainable industry.

Farm-raised salmon is British Columbia’s largest agricultural export item, and contributes over $1.14 billion to the BC economy every year. Already a significant portion of this goes directly to First Nations communities and there is potential for much greater involvement by First Nations people.

MYTH #3

The BC salmon farming industry is a huge multinational industry run by Norwegians. Norwegians came to Canada because there are no regulations and they have complete disregard for what happens in Canada.  

The Facts:

Norwegian investment into British Columbia salmon farming was encouraged by Canadian governments back in the 1980's. Many Canadian salmon farming companies went bankrupt in the 80's for many reasons and Canadian banks would no longer take the risk. Norway had the expertise, money and courage to invest in the early years of salmon farming in BC.  Afterall, the Norwegians had started farming in Norway in the late 60's and were eager to bring their knowledge to Canada and grow product closer to a large U.S. market.

The facts are; Aquaculture regulations in Canada are known to be some of the most stringent regulations in the world. The myth that Norwegians came to Canada because they longed for "no regulation" in simply that - a myth.

The facts are; BC salmon farms employ 5,000 Canadians. Although some companies still have head offices based in Norway, the Canadian business units are operated by Canadians, with local decisions being made by Canadian people.

One of the largest companies in BC, Marine Harvest Canada, is not Norwegian owned. It is a publicly traded company,  Marine Harvest shareholders are from all parts of the world.

The facts are; The operations of the farm-raised salmon industry impact the B.C. economy through expenditures on goods and services (such as feed, equipment, transportation and veterinary services), the employment of staff and the generation of tax revenues for local, provincial and federal governments. In 2013, farming salmon in B.C. generated approximately $1.14 billion to the province’s economy.

5,000 good paying wages are spent in British Columbia.

Other "Canadian" companies not 100% Canadian owned?;  Tim Hortons, Hudson's Bay Company, Sears Canada, Molson Brewries, CN Rail, CCM Hockey, Fairmont Hotels, Seagram distillery, Labbatt Brewing Company, Honda Canada, Ford Canada, Toyota Canada, DaimlerChrysler Canada, Costco Canada...you get the point.